Categories

256
Truth will come to light... at the length, the truth will out.
307
But love is blind and lovers cannot see<br /> The pretty follies that themselves commit;<br /> For if they could, Cupid himself would blush<br /> To see me...
308
They are as sick that surfeit with too much, as they starve with nothing.
267
My ventures are not in one bottom trusted, nor to one place.
271
I do know of these that... only are reputed wise for saying nothing.
292
His reasons are as two grains of wheat his in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.
271
Belike you thought our love would last too long, if it were chain'd together.
288
Against my soul's pure truth why labour you to make it wander in an unknown field?
246
I will fasten on this sleeve of thine: thou art an elm, my husband, I a vine.
312
How comes it, that thou art then estranged from thyself?
300
Every why hath a wherefore.
333
A woman mov'd is like a fountain troubled, muddy,<br /> ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty.
242
My tongue will tell the anger of mine heart, Or else my heart, concealing it, will break.
273
Exit, pursued by a bear.
286
When to the sessions of sweet silent thought<br /> I summon up remembrance of things past,<br /> I sigh the lack of many things I sought,<br /> And with old...
283
327
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?<br /> Thou art more lovely and more temperate:<br /> Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,<br /> And summer's...
239
Nothing 'gainst Times scythe can make defence.
245
Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing.
266
This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, to love that well which thou must leave ere long.